Higher Education

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Writing by Choice, Second Edition: Chapter Four

Instructions:

Question 1:


a) They introduce and develop important points, while providing transitions to what precedes and follows.
b) They reveal the essay’s main conclusion.
c) They describe the essay’s topic and how it is treated.
d) They summarize the essay’s overall claims.

Question 2:


a) help writers organize their thoughts
b) reiterate the thesis statement
c) develop the discussion
d) focus the discussion, giving the paragraph force and unity

Question 3:


a) includes the main idea in the paragraph
b) contributes to the paragraph’s unity
c) is often, but not always, the first sentence
d) All of the above

Question 4:


a) the thesis
b) the title
c) the body
d) the conclusion

Question 5:


a) that including a wrap is often a useful strategy in paragraph construction
b) that including a wrap unnecessarily lengthens the paragraph
c) that including a wrap is necessary so the reader can remember the main idea in the paragraph
d) All of the above.

Question 6:


a) the bibliography of sources
b) the conclusion of an essay
c) the thesis of an essay
d) None of the above.

Question 7:


a) repeats the topic sentence word for word
b) introduces the main topic of the following paragraph
c) reinforces the topic sentence by using different words
d) immediately follows the topic sentence

Question 8:


a) a highly specific idea, such as an example or illustration
b) the evidence for a claim
c) a general idea, the main idea of the paragraph
d) explanatory matter

Question 9:


a) trust their instincts to ensure that the reader will be able to follow the ideas
b) need not be concerned about transitions between paragraphs
c) ask if the relationship between the thoughts in each paragraph is clear
d) provide regular summaries of the thought to ensure coherence

Question 10:


a) repeat the topic sentence of the previous paragraph
b) use a "paragraph wrap "
c) use transitional expressions
d) refer indirectly to the previous paragraph in the new topic sentence

Question 11:


a) they may appear also in the middle or at the end of a paragraph
b) they never appear in the middle of a paragraph
c) they never appear at the end of a paragraph
d) they are generally not required at all

Question 12:


a) the writer shapes them intuitively
b) they make use of several forms of paragraph development
c) they contain only one central idea
d) they combine several disparate ideas

Question 13:


a) the reader may become bored
b) the reader may see them as unsophisticated and insufficiently developed
c) the reader may become confused
d) None of the above.

Question 14:


a) focussed on one idea
b) easy to follow
c) challenging or complex
d) well-developed

Question 15:


a) contain jumbled ideas and are difficult to read and understand
b) tend to be more interesting
c) keep the reader alert
d) can be repaired with the use of stronger topic sentences

Question 16:


a) explanatory footnotes
b) definitions provided in parentheses
c) quotations and paraphrases
d) repeated key words, regular rhythms, parallel structures, and transitional expressions

Question 17:


a) repeating key words continually throughout a paragraph
b) never repeating the same word twice in a paragraph
c) repeating key words strategically in a paragraph
d) if you feel the need to repeat a word, it should be taken as a sign that the paragraph is inadequately developed

Question 18:


a) chronological
b) spatial
c) cause and effect
d) All of the above

Question 19:


a) can also function as transitional expressions between separate sentences
b) do not function like transitional expressions, because they connect ideas within a single sentence
c) should be scrupulously avoided in academic prose
d) None of the above.

Question 20:


a) limit or concession
b) cause and effect
c) illustration
d) sequence and addition

Question 21:


a) contrast or qualification
b) aummary or conclusion
c) limit or concession
d) cause and effect

Question 22:


a) sequence and addition
b) contrast or qualification
c) illustration
d) summary or conclusion

Question 23:


a) They can never be overused.
b) They provide a link between ideas which otherwise would seem unrelated.
c) They can assist the reader in moving from one idea to the next.
d) None of the above.

Question 24:


a) assist the writer in organizing his or her thoughts
b) help the writer establish an effective thesis statement
c) assist the reader in absorbing the content of the essay
d) create reader interest, present the main idea, and give a preview of what follows

Question 25:


a) revealing the paper’s organization
b) listing the paper’s specific points
c) situating the paper’s approach in a larger context
d) None of the above.

Question 26:


a) It was first employed by priestly scribes in ancient Egypt.
b) It begins with a specific statement and moves to the most general statement.
c) It begins with a general statement and moves to a specific statement, the thesis.
d) All of the above are true.

Question 27:


a) the familiar to the unfamiliar
b) the past to the present
c) the general to the more general
d) None of the above.

Question 28:


a) The essay begins with an interesting quotation or a compelling question.
b) The essay begins with a general or universal statement and moves to a specific statement.
c) The essay begins with a statement that taps into a shared feeling between writer and reader.
d) None of the above.

Question 29:


a) is an example of the “logical approach ”
b) is a fresh way of capturing the reader’s interest
c) is a good example of the dramatic introduction
d) is not a good example of the dramatic introduction

Question 30:


a) as it is not reason-based, it is unsuitable for formal writing
b) the essay begins with a statement that is neither universal nor specific but somewhere in between the two
c) in the introduction, the writer tries to present something shocking
d) None of the above.

Question 31:


a) is by slightly embellishing the truth
b) should be relevant to their topic
c) is by presenting only the facts
d) is by drawing on life experiences

Question 32:


a) leading the reader into the essay
b) introducing the topic of the essay
c) introducing the thesis or main idea
d) introducing the writer

Question 33:


a) will depend mostly on how much research is completed
b) will depend partly on the length of the essay
c) should never exceed four to five sentences
d) should always be as brief as you can make it

Question 34:


a) the too obvious opening
b) the too abrupt opening
c) the overstated claim
d) the irrelevant opening

Question 35:


a) the thesis and the statement
b) the opening and the conclusion
c) the noun and the verb
d) the topic and the comment

Question 36:


a) The statement is effective.
b) The statement names a topic, which is sufficient.
c) The statement names a topic, but needs to make a comment.
d) None of the above.

Question 37:


a) the simple and the expanded
b) the simple and the complex
c) the expanded and the specific
d) the manageable and the expanded

Question 38:


a) specific
b) manageable
c) interesting
d) All of the above.

Question 39:


a) the unclear thesis
b) the thesis that straddles two topics instead of focusing on one
c) the “stiff” thesis
d) a thesis that lacks parallel structure

Question 40:


a) the unclear thesis
b) the thesis that straddles two topics instead of focusing on one
c) the “stiff” thesis
d) a thesis that lacks parallel structure

Question 41:


a) the unclear thesis
b) the thesis that straddles two topics instead of focusing on one
c) the “stiff” thesis
d) a thesis that lacks parallel structure

Question 42:


a) They have been prepared for every step of the way.
b) They are predictable but not repetitive.
c) They encourage the reader to reconsider the thesis statement in light of the essay’s unfolding discussion.
d) All of the above.

Question 43:


a) They point to ramifications of the thesis or suggest follow-up research that needs to be done.
b) They close the circle by bringing the reader back to the starting point, but in a fresh way.
c) They open the circle by leading the reader to points not yet discussed.
d) They continue to circle until the final statement.

Question 44:


a) They bring the reader back to the starting point.
b) They present a new point in the final sentence.
c) They do not address the thesis.
d) They point to ramifications of the thesis or suggest follow-up research that needs to be done.

Question 45:


a) writing a conclusion much longer than your introduction
b) mentioning a new point
c) giving an example or illustration to support your thesis
d) All of the above.