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Sociology, 4e: Chapter 25

Instructions: For each question, click on the radio button beside your answer. When you have completed the entire quiz, click the Submit my answers button at the bottom of the page to receive your results.

Question 1:


a) 50 per cent
b) 60 per cent
c) 70 per cent
d) 80 per cent
e) 90 per cent

Question 2:


a) Digital converters
b) Digital immigrants
c) Digital migrators
d) Digital learners
e) Digital invaders

Question 3:


a) is a “system” involving organization, procedures, symbols, new worlds, and most importantly, mindset
b) is a combination of complex technical components, with no consideration of social factors or processes
c) describes an abstract concept and not an object; it is a human activity comprising of goal and mechanism
d) encompasses knowledge, mechanisms, skills, and apparatus that are geared toward controlling and transforming society
e) is based upon, utilizes, and generates a complex body of knowledge, part of which may reasonably called specifically technological knowledge

Question 4:


a) is a “system” involving organization, procedures, symbols, new worlds, and most importantly, mindset
b) is a combination of complex technical components, with no consideration of social factors or processes
c) describes an abstract concept and not an object; it is a human activity comprising of goal and mechanism
d) encompasses knowledge, mechanisms, skills, and apparatus that are geared toward controlling and transforming society
e) is based upon, utilizes, and generates a complex body of knowledge, part of which may reasonably called specifically technological knowledge

Question 5:


a) is a “system” involving organization, procedures, symbols, new worlds, and most importantly, mindset
b) is a combination of complex technical components, with no consideration of social factors or processes
c) describes an abstract concept and not an object; it is a human activity comprising of goal and mechanism
d) encompasses knowledge, mechanisms, skills, and apparatus that are geared toward controlling and transforming society
e) is based upon, utilizes, and generates a complex body of knowledge, part of which may reasonably called specifically technological knowledge

Question 6:


a) Community lost—technology creates isolation and a general lack of public spaces.
b) Community saved—the return of flourishing pre-industrial era connected networks, as people live in densely populated cities and form close-knit clusters.
c) Community lost—long work hours leave little time for people to connect with family, neighbours, and friends.
d) Community gained—the rise of social networking sites has led to the development of new “virtual” communities.
e) Community liberated—densely connected groups and clusters no longer exist, and socialization takes place outside narrowly defined geographic confines.

Question 7:


a) the telephone
b) in-person visits
c) video calls
d) social media sites
e) the ability to travel

Question 8:


a) Dystopian—the Internet draws people away from their immediate, local environments, potentially alienating them from social engagement and civic participation.
b) Utopian—digital media are leading to new forms of community that allow people with common interests to meet.
c) Supplement—as a medium, the Internet adds to other forms of communication rather than replacing them.
d) Dystopian—the Internet could have detrimental effects on urban life as people look to the Internet for entertainment and socialization and move away from public spaces.
e) Fusion—the Internet has the ability to create new forms of community, while at the same time changing the traditional definition of community.

Question 9:


a) the use of cellphones in public spaces was much lower than expected
b) the majority of those who used their cellphones were in large group settings
c) on average, individuals were using their cellphones for 15 minutes
d) the number of individuals looking at their cellphones was significantly higher than the number of individuals talking on their cellphones
e) on the steps of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York city, about 45 per cent of individuals used their devices.

Question 10:


a) A recent United Nations report suggested that access to the Internet should be considered a basic human right.
b) Sociologists cannot focus on the access divide alone—we run the risk of overlooking other divides, such as the skills divide.
c) Most of the early research in investigating the digital divide failed to examine the access divide.
d) It is difficult to place fibre optic and other cables in permafrost, making it expensive and challenging to provide Internet access to the Canada’s Northern regions.
e) In 2008 as many as 10 per cent of Americans continued to access the Web via dial-up Internet.

Question 11:


a) Lack of infrastructure
b) Geographic barriers
c) Poor computing skills
d) Cultural barriers
e) Lack of support

Question 12:


a) the frontstage
b) writing oneself into being
c) data curation
d) the backstage
e) the agency of the self

Question 13:


a) the frontstage
b) writing oneself into being
c) data curation
d) the backstage
e) the agency of the self

Question 14:


a) 10 per cent
b) 20 per cent
c) 30 per cent
d) 40 per cent
e) 50 per cent

Question 15:


a) one who constructs the identity of sincerely wishing to be part of the group in question
b) one who professes and conveys pseudo-sincere intentions
c) one who lures others into pointless and time-consuming discussions
d) one who intends to cause disruption and/or to trigger or exacerbate conflict for the purposes of their own amusement
e) one whose primary aim is to emotionally hurt another person

Question 16:


a) The high success of pairing couples on certain sites.
b) Ubiquitous access to the internet.
c) The diminished social stigma associated with online dating.
d) The affordable cost of Internet matchmaking services.
e) All of the above.

Question 17:


a) SNSs display information about the relationship publicly.
b) SNSs facilitate the monitoring of one’s partner in a way that is socially acceptable.
c) SNSs have an abundance of persistent information about one’s partner in the form of digital traces
d) SNSs track information about the relationship, such as sending reminders of anniversaries and the partner’s birthday.
e) None of the above.

Question 18:


a) 40 per cent
b) 50 per cent
c) 60 per cent
d) 80 per cent
e) 80 per cent

Question 19:


a) Considering texting as the least appropriate medium for ending a relationship.
b) Unfriending an ex-partner on Facebook.
c) Believing Facebook connections are permanent.
d) Logging into Facebook as your ex-partner.
e) Adjusting the privacy settings of your Facebook account.

Question 20:


a) the coexistence of individuals who are self-serving units
b) the coexistence of individuals who come together because of an overarching goal
c) when people are only loosely connected
d) a cohesive social group with a slow-paced lifestyle
e) modern society

Question 21:


a) Time for leisure in our current technology-driven information society appears to be shrinking.
b) At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, utopian visions of technology predicted our leisure time would shrink.
c) Life occurs much more rapidly as information travels instantaneously.
d) Time-space compression refers to the ways in which our societal practices change the qualities of and interactions between time and space.
e) The practice of sharing with others how busy we are creates a circular loop, as feelings of “non-busyness” are perceived to be symptomatic of unproductive lives.

Question 22:


a) a serious health concern
b) a sign of “unlikability”
c) becoming of concern for future productivity levels
d) a status symbol
e) an inherent result of the Industrial Revolution