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Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

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New and Noteworthy:

These are some of Oxford's most recent publications. 



The Oxford Companion to Wine

Edited by Jancis Robinson
Assistant Editor Julia Harding

Published in 1994 to worldwide acclaim, the first edition of Jancis Robinson's seminal volume immediately attained legendary status, winning every major wine book award including the Glenfiddich and Julia Child/IACP awards, as well as writer and woman of the year accolades for its editor on both sides of the Atlantic. Combining meticulously-researched fact with refreshing opinion and wit, The Oxford Companion to Wine presents almost 4,000 entries on every wine-related topic imaginable, from regions and grape varieties to the owners, connoisseurs, growers, and tasters in wine through the ages; from viticulture and oenology to the history of wine, from its origins to the present day. (Read more)




Failure

Why Science Is So Successful

Stuart Firestein

The general public has a glorified view of the pursuit of scientific research. However, the idealized perception of science as a rule-based, methodical system for accumulating facts could not be further from the truth. Modern science involves the idiosyncratic, often bumbling search for understanding in uncharted territories, full of wrong turns, false findings, and the occasional remarkable success.(Read more)




Soda Politics

Dr. Marion Nestle
Foreword by Mark Bittman and Afterword by Neal Baer

Sodas are astonishing products. Little more than flavored sugar-water, these drinks cost practically nothing to produce or buy, yet have turned their makers - principally Coca-Cola and PepsiCo - into a multibillion-dollar industry with global recognition, distribution, and political power. Billed as "refreshing," "tasty," "crisp," and "the real thing," sodas also happen to be so well established to contribute to poor dental hygiene, higher calorie intake, obesity, and type-2 diabetes that the first line of defense against any of these conditions is to simply stop drinking them. (Read more)




Origins

Jim Baggott

What is the nature of the material world? How does it work? What is the universe and how was it formed? What is life? Where do we come from and how did we evolve? How and why do we think? What does it mean to be human? How do we know?.(Read more)




Atlas of the World

Oxford

The only world atlas updated annually, guaranteeing that users will find the most current geographic information, Oxford's Atlas of the World is the most authoritative atlas on the market. Full of crisp, clear cartography of urban areas and virtually uninhabited landscapes around the globe, the Atlas is filled with maps of cities and regions at carefully selected scales that give a striking view of the Earth's surface. It opens with a fascinating look at world statistics, a six-page special on "The Future of the Oceans and Seas," and satellite images of earth, including eleven stunning images sourced from.(Read more)




New Concise World Atlas

Oxford

With hundreds of dramatic, full-color, large-format maps produced by Europe's finest team of cartographers, the fifth edition of the New Concise World Atlas solidifies Oxford's position as the only publisher of regularly updated atlases at every desirable size and price. (Read more)




The Betrayal

Charles Fountain

In the most famous scandal of sports history, eight Chicago White Sox players--including Shoeless Joe Jackson--agreed to throw the 1919 World Series to the Cincinnati Reds in exchange for the promise of $20,000 each from gamblers reportedly working for New York mobster Arnold Rothstein. Heavily favored, Chicago lost the Series five games to three. Although rumors of a fix flew while the series was being played, they were largely disregarded by players and the public at large.(Read more)




Go-Betweens for Hitler

Karina Urbach

This is the untold story of how some of Germany's top aristocrats contributed to Hitler's secret diplomacy during the Third Reich, providing a direct line to their influential contacts and relations across Europe - especially in Britain, where their contacts included the press baron and Daily Mail owner Lord Rothermere and the future King Edward VIII.(Read more)




Failed: Why Science is So Successful

Mark Weisbrot

Why did the Eurozone end up with an unemployment rate more than twice than that of the United States and six years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers? Was crisis in the Eurozone inevitable? What caused the prolonged economic failure experienced by the majority of the world's low- and middle-income countries at the end of the 20th century?. (Read more)




To Save Humanity

Edited by Julio Frenk and Steven Hoffman

"The UN was not created to take mankind to heaven, but to save humanity from hell." -- Dag Hammarskjöld, United Nations Secretary-General 1953-1961

The turn of the 21st century was an objective low point in the history of human health: AIDS was scourging Africa, millions of women died each year in child birth, and billions suffered under malnourishment and poverty. In response, the United Nations launched its Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), an ambitious charter that since 2000 has measurably reduced the worldwide burdens of poverty, hunger, and disease.(Read more)




The Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations

Edited by Gyles Brandreth and Gyles Brandreth

Writer, broadcaster, and wit Gyles Brandreth has completely revised Ned Sherrin's classic collection of wisecracks, one-liners, and anecdotes. With over 1,000 new quotations from all media, it's easy to find hilarious quotes on subjects ranging from Argument to Diets, from Computers to The Weather. Add sparkle to your speeches and presentations, or just enjoy a good laugh in company with Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, Joan Rivers, Kathy Lette, Frankie Boyle, and friends.(Read more)




Ecology or Catastrophe

Janet Biehl

The compelling biography of revolutionary social ecologist Murray Bookchin.

Murray Bookchin was not only one of the most significant and influential environmental philosophers of the twentieth-century - he was also one of the most prescient. From deforestation to nuclear radiation, Bookchin has been at the forefront of every major ecological issue since the very beginning, often proposing a solution before most people even recognized there was a problem.(Read more)