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New and Noteworthy: Page Two

These are some of Oxford's most recent publications. 

Page 1 | Page 2

The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature

William Toye

Based on the critically acclaimed Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, this second concise edition has been fully updated by editor William Toye. The revised entries include books published up to 2010, in addition to 42 new entries that discuss such notable figures as Joseph Boyden, Yann Martel, Miriam Toews, Michael Crummey, and Lisa Moore. (Read more)

The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature

Begat

David Crystal

They are all in the King James Bible. This astonishing book "has contributed far more to English in the way of idiomatic or quasi-proverbial expressions than any other literary source." So wrote David Crystal in 2004. In A Book of Many Colours he returns to the subject not only to consider how a work published in 1611 could have had such influence on the language, but how it can still do so when few regularly hear the Bible and fewer still hear it in the language of Stuart England. (Read more)

Begat

Staying Power

Michael A. Cusumano

As we move into an era of simultaneous innovation and commoditization, enabled by digital technologies, managers around the world are asking themselves "how can we both adapt to rapid changes in technology and markets, and still make enough money to survive - and thrive?" To provide answers to these important and urgent questions, MIT Sloan School of Management Professor Michael Cusumano draws on nearly 30 years of research into the practices of global corporations that have been acknowledged leaders and benchmark setters - and Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Google, and others in software, internet services, and consumer electronics, and Toyota in manufacturing. (Read more)

Staying Power

The Best Things in Life

Thomas Hurka

For centuries, philosophers, theologians, moralists, and ordinary people have asked: How should we live? What makes for a good life? In The Best Things in Life, distinguished philosopher Thomas Hurka takes a fresh look at these perennial questions as they arise for us now in the 21st century. Should we value family over career? How do we balance self-interest and serving others? What activities bring us the most joy? While religion, literature, popular psychology, and everyday wisdom all grapple with these questions, philosophy more than anything else uses the tools of reason to make important distinctions, cut away irrelevancies, and distill these issues down to their essentials. (Read more)

The Best Things in Life

Galileo

John Heilbron

Four hundred years ago, in 1610, Galileo published the Siderius nuncius, or Starry Messenger, a 'hurried little masterpiece' in John Heilbron's words. Presenting to the world his remarkable observations using the recently invented telescope - of the craters of the moon, and the satellites of Jupiter, observations that forced changes to perceptions of the perfection of the heavens and the centrality of the Earth - the appearance of the little book is regarded as one of the greatest moments in the history of science. It was also a point of change in the life of Galileo himself, propelling him from professor to prophet. (Read more)

Galileo

A History of Canadian Culture

Jonathan F. Vance

From Dorset sculpture to the Barenaked Ladies, award-winning historian Jonathan F. Vance reveals a storyteller's ear for narrative. In a country this diverse, 'culture' has different meanings. Vance tells a story from the wind-swept Arctic where a stranded Innu woman, fighting to survive, took the time to decorate her clothing with rich designs. A British explorer was amazed at her efforts, but Vance reminds us of the inseparable connection between life and art in Inuit culture (the Innu word for 'breathe' also means 'to make poetry,' and both derive from the word for 'the soul'). No surprise that Aboriginal culture began to change irrevocably with the arrival of more Europeans (who brought their own ideas about culture). But that is another tale in Vance's fascinating History. (Read more)

A History of Canadian Culture

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Military History

J. L. Granatstein and Dean F. Oliver

The battle of Vimy Ridge, the Dieppe raid, the Italian Campaign: the Canadian military has been indispensable to many of the greatest victories - and disasters - of our time. The evolution of Canada as a military power is chronicled here by military historians J.L. Granatstein and Dean F. Oliver in this authoritative and highly readable book. (Read more)

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Military History

OK, The Improbable Story of America's Greatest Word

Allan Metcalf

It is said to be the most frequently spoken (or typed) word on the planet, more common than an infant's first word ma or the ever-present beverage Coke. It was even the first word spoken on the moon. It is "OK" -- the most ubiquitous and invisible of American expressions, one used countless times every day. Yet few of us know the secret history of OK - how it was coined, what it stood for, and the amazing extent of its influence. (Read more)

OK, The Improbable Story of America's Greatest Word

Power and Inequality

Gregg Olsen

This groundbreaking book examines the nature and implications of social inequality in a new and illuminating way. The author examines key measures of social inequality and indicators of poverty across six selected nations - three Anglo-American countries (the US, UK, and Canada), and three Nordic nations (Finland, Norway, and Sweden). Professor Olsen's research shows that while inequality is an inherent and pervasive aspect of capitalism, and while the past few decades have seen sharp rises in inequality across the industrialized world, nonetheless substantial variances between countries continue to exist. In those countries like the US that have most zealously embraced neoliberalism, inequality and poverty have been exacerbated to a much greater degree than is the case in the Nordic lands, which still rank among the most egalitarian of countries. (Read more)

Power and Inequality

The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company

Christopher Armstrong and H. V. Nelles

Bribery! Corruption! Fist fights on the steps of City Hall. Thunderings from the pulpits! Mass meetings, petitions, rallies, unrest in the streets! The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company is a lighthearted, impeccably researched excursion through the thickets of chicanery, hypocrisy and sanctimony that were the special marks of High Victorian Toronto.

A classic Toronto story, Revenge will appeal to the general reader interested in Canadian history, and more specifically, local history at the turn of the century. The book will also be useful to those interested in local politics and the evolution of public transportation. (Read more)

The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company

Hitler's First War


The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company

Dr. Thomas Weber

Hitler clai

Christopher Armstrong and H. V. Nelles

Bribery! Corruption! Fist fights on the steps of City Hall. Thunderings from the pulpits! Mass meetings, petitions, rallies, unrest in the streets! The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company is a lighthearted, impeccably researched excursion through the thickets of chicanery, hypocrisy and sanctimony that were the special marks of High Victorian Toronto.

A classic Toronto story, Revenge will appeal to the general reader interested in Canadian history, and more specifically, local history at the turn of the century. The book will also be useful to those interested in local politics and the evolution of public transportation. (Read more)

The Revenge of the Methodist Bicycle Company

Hitler's First War

Dr. Thomas Weber

Hitler claimed that his years as a soldier in the First World War were the most formative years of his life. However, for the six decades since his death in the ruins of Berlin, Hitler's time as a soldier on the Western Front has, remarkably, remained a blank spot. Until now, all that we knew about Hitler's life in these years and the regiment in which he served came from his own account in Mein Kampf and the equally mythical accounts of his comrades.

Hitler's First War for the first time looks at what really happened to Private Hitler and the men of the Bavarian List Regiment of which he was a member. It is a radical revision of the period of Hitler's life that is said to have made him. Through the stories of the veterans of the regiment - an officer who became Hitler's personal adjutant in the 1930s but then offered himself to British intelligence, a soldier-turned-Concentration Camp Commander, Jewish veterans who fell victim to the Holocaust, or of veterans who simply returned to their lives in Bavaria - Thomas Weber presents a Private Hitler very different from the one portrayed in his own mythical account. Instead, we find a Hitler who was shunned by the frontline soldiers of his regiment as a 'rear area pig' and who was still unsure of his political ideology even at the end of the war in 1918. (Read more)

Hitler's First War Adolf Hitler, the Men of the List Regiment, and the First World War

The Unknown Country: Canada and Her People

Bruce Hutchison

From one of Canada's greatest journalists comes this classic study of the country's history, culture, and society. First published in 1942, The Unknown Country won the Governor General's Award for non-fiction and cemented Hutchison's reputation as the nation's pre-eminent political commentator. More than 60 years later, The Unknown Country offers an unforgettable portrait of a country hauntingly familiar yet lost beyond recall. Filled with intriguing anecdotes about people and places once well-known, now all-too-often forgotten; rooted in a deep understanding of Canadians' accomplishments and challenges; written in prose lively and lucid - The Unknown Country remains one of the most evocative portraits of Canada ever committed to print, and its author among the most penetrating interpreters of the national character. (Read more)

The Unknown Country: Canada and Her People by  Bruce Hutchison

The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It

Philip Ball

From Bach fugues to Indonesian gamelan, from nursery rhymes to rock, music has cast its light onto every corner of human culture. But why music excites such deep passions, and how we make sense of musical sound at all have, until recently, remained mysterious. Now in The Music Instinct, award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how music works its magic, and why, as much as eating and sleeping, it seems indispensable to humanity. Deftly weaving together the latest findings in brain science with history, mathematics, and philosophy, The Music Instinct not only deepens our appreciation of the music we love, but shows that we would not be ourselves without it. The Sunday Times hailed it as "a wonderful account of why music matters," with Ball's "passion for music evident on every page." (Read more)

The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It

Philosophy Bites

Dr. David Edmonds and Dr. Nigel Warburton

Philosophy Bites is a selection of the best interviews from the hugely successful podcast of the same name. Leading philosophers discuss a wide range of philosophical issues, from ethics to aesthetics to metaphysics, in a lively, informal, personal way. Time, infinity, evil, friendship, animals, wine, sport, tragedy - all human life is here.

Philosophy Bites was set up in 2007 by David Edmonds and Nigel Warburton. It has, to date, had 5 million downloads, and is listened to all over the world. (Read more)

Philosophy Bites

Gay, Straight, and the Reason Why: TThe Science of Sexual Orientation

Simon LeVay

What causes a child to grow up gay or straight? In this book, neuroscientist Simon LeVay summarizes a wealth of scientific evidence that points to one inescapable conclusion: Sexual orientation results primarily from an interaction between genes, sex hormones, and the cells of the developing body and brain.

LeVay helped create this field in 1991 with a much-publicized study in Science, where he reported on a difference in the brain structure between gay and straight men. Since then, an entire scientific discipline has sprung up around the quest for a biological explanation of sexual orientation. In this book, LeVay provides a clear explanation of where the science stands today, taking the reader on a whirlwind tour of laboratories that specialize in genetics, endocrinology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, evolutionary psychology, and family demographics. He describes, for instance, how researchers have manipulated the sex hormone levels of animals during development, causing them to mate preferentially with animals of their own gender. LeVay also reports on the prevalence of homosexual behavior among wild animals, ranging from Graylag geese to the Bonobo chimpanzee. (Read more)

Gay, Straight, and the Reason Why: TThe Science of Sexual Orientation by Simon LeVay

The Firm: The Inside Story of the Stasi

Gary Bruce

Based on previously classified documents and on interviews with former secret police officers and ordinary citizens, The Firm is the first comprehensive history of East Germany's secret police, the Stasi, at the grassroots level. Focusing on Gransee and Perleberg, two East German districts located north of Berlin, Gary Bruce reveals how the Stasi monitored small-town East Germany. He paints an eminently human portrait of those involved with this repressive arm of the government, featuring interviews with former officers that uncover a wide array of personalities, from devoted ideologues to reluctant opportunists, most of whom talked frankly about East Germany's obsession with surveillance. Their paths after the collapse of Communism are gripping stories of resurrection and despair, of renewal and demise, of remorse and continued adherence to the movement. The book also sheds much light on the role of the informant, the Stasi's most important tool in these out-of-the-way areas. Providing on-the-ground empirical evidence of how the Stasi operated on a day-to-day basis with ordinary people, this remarkable volume offers an unparalleled picture of life in a totalitarian state. (Read more)

The Firm: The Inside Story of the Stasi

No Passport: A Discovery of Canada

Translated by Joyce Marshall

A classic of Canadian travel literature, No Passport is Quebecois novelist and broadcaster Eugène Cloutier's account of his discovery of his country. In the mid-1960s, Cloutier travelled from coast to coast, visiting every province as well as the Yukon. He describes his experiences with wit and elegance. The result is an affectionate portrait of a Canada many still recall but which is no more. (Read more)

No Passport: A Discovery of Canada

Energy in Canada

Peter Sinclair

Energy is at the core of the way Canadians live. Yet recent research indicates that North America's supply of oil - our most consumed source of primary energy - may only last until 2025. So what happens when this valuable resource runs dry? In this highly readable introduction, Peter Sinclair examines the history of energy production and consumption leading to the impending energy "crisis." What policy decisions have been made along the way and in whose interest? From the Alberta oil sands to offshore drilling in Newfoundland and Labrador, Sinclair delves into the hot button issues that affect Canadians today. Looking ahead, he points to which alternative and renewable energies we may rely on and the environmental, social, and political pressures that are increasingly pushing Canadians toward a critical change.    (Read more)

Energy in Canada

Is There Anything Good About Men?

Roy F. Baumeister

This book offers provocative answers to these and many other questions about the current state of manhood in America. Baumeister argues that relations between men and women are now and have always been more cooperative than antagonistic, that men and women are different in basic ways, and that successful cultures capitalize on these differences to outperform rival cultures. Amongst our ancestors - as with many other species - only the alpha males were able to reproduce, leading them to take more risks and to exhibit more aggressive and protective behaviors than women, whose evolutionary strategies required a different set of behaviors. Whereas women favor and excel at one-to-one intimate relationships, men compete with one another and build larger organizations and social networks from which culture grows. But cultures in turn exploit men by insisting that their role is to achieve and produce, to provide for others, and if necessary to sacrifice themselves. Baumeister shows that while men have greatly benefited from the culture they have created, they have also suffered because of it. Men may dominate the upper echelons of business and politics, but far more men than women die in work-related accidents, are incarcerated, or are killed in battle--facts nearly always left out of current gender debates.    (Read more)

Is There Anything Good About Men

Playing Our Game

Edward Steinfeld

This book asserts that China's growth is fortifying American commercial supremacy, because (as the title says) China is playing our game. By seeking to realize its dream of modernization by integrating itself into the Western economic order, China is playing by our rules, reinforcing the dominance of our companies and regulatory institutions. The impact of the outside world has been largely beneficial to China's development, but also enormously disruptive. China has in many ways handed over - outsourced - the remaking of its domes

Your Brain on Food

Gary L. Wenk

Why is eating chocolate so pleasurable? Can the function of just one small group of chemicals really determine whether you are happy or sad? Does marijuana help to improve your memory in old age? Is it really best to drink coffee if you want to wake up and be alert? Why is a drug like PCP potentially lethal? Why does drinking alcohol make you drowsy? Do cigarettes help relieve anxiety? Can eating less food preserve your brain? What are the possible side effects of pills that claim to make you smarter? Why is it so hard to stop smoking? Why did witches once believe that they could fly? In this book, Gary Wenk demonstrates how, as a result of their effects on certain neurotransmitters concerned with behavior, everything we put into our bodies has direct consequences for how we think, feel, and act. The chapters introduce each of the main neurotransmitters involved with behavior, discuss its role in the brain, and explain ways to influence it through what we consume.    (Read more)

Your Brain on Food

No Turning Back

Paul Addison

In No Turning Back, Paul Addison takes the long view, charting the vastly changing character of British society since the end of the Second World War. As he shows, in this period a series of peaceful revolutions has completely transformed the country so that, with the advantage of a longer perspective, the comparative peace and growing prosperity of the second half of the twentieth century appear as more powerful solvents of settled ways of life than the Battle of the Somme or the Blitz.    (Read more)

No Turning Back

Deathly Deception

Denis Smyth

This book retells the story of the classic World War Two intelligence plan to pass misleading strategic information to Hitler and his Generals that was immortalized in the 1956 Hollywood film The Man Who Never Was.    (Read more)

Deathly Deception

Secret Language

Barry J. Blake

This book is about language designed to mean what it does not seem to mean. Ciphers and codes conceal messages and protect secrets. Symbol and magic hide meanings to imperil or delight. Languages made to baffle and confuse let insiders talk openly without being understood by those beyond the circle. Barry Blake looks in depth at these and many more. He explores the history and uses of the slangs and argots of schools and trades. He traces the histories of centuries-old cants such as those used by sailors and criminals, among them polari, the mix of Italian, Yiddish, and slang spoken once among strolling players and circus folk and then taken up by groups in London. He examines the sacred languages of ancient cults and religions, uncovers the workings of onomancy, spells, and gematria, considers the obliqueness of allusion and parody, and celebrates the absurdities of euphemism and jargon.

   (Read more)

 

Secret Language

Shakespeare, Sex, and Love

Stanley Wells

How does Shakespeare's treatment of human sexuality relate to the sexual conventions and language of his times? Pre-eminent Shakespearean critic Stanley Wells draws on historical and anecdotal sources to present an illuminating account of sexual behaviour in Shakespeare's time, particularly in Stratford-upon-Avon and London. He demonstrates what we know or can deduce of the sex lives of Shakespeare and members of his family. He also provides a fascinating account of depictions of sexuality in the poetry of the period and suggests that at the time Shakespeare was writing most of his non-dramatic verse a group of poets catered especially for readers with homoerotic tastes.   (Read more)

Shakespeare, Sex, and Love

The Qur'an

Translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem

The Qur'an, believed by Muslims to be the word of God, was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad 1400 years ago. Recognized as the greatest literary masterpiece in Arabic, the sacred text has nevertheless remained difficult to understand in its English translations. First published in 2004, M.A.S. Abdel Haleem's translation has been acclaimed for its success in avoiding archaism and cryptic language to produce a version that is both faithful to the original and easy to read. Now for the first time it is published with the original Arabic text to give a greater appreciation and understanding of the holy book. The traditional Arabic calligraphic pages are displayed alongside the English translation, which has been revised for this new edition. A useful general introduction on the revelation, stylistic features, issues of interpretation and translation of the Qur'an is included, together with summaries of each sura, essential footnotes and an index. The verses are individually numbered to facilitate comparison with the Arabic. It is an edition both for those familiar with the Qur'an and for those coming to it for the first time; the message of the Qur'an was directly addressed to all people regardless of class, gender, or age, and this dual-language edition is equally accessible to everyone.   (Read more)

The Qur'an

Dr. McKeown's Cabinet of Roman Curiosities

J. C. McKeown

Here is a whimsical and captivating collection of odd facts, strange beliefs, outlandish opinions, and other highly amusing trivia of the ancient Romans. We tend to think of the Romans as a pragmatic people with a ruthlessly efficient army, an exemplary legal system, and a precise and elegant language. A Cabinet of Roman Curiosities shows that the Romans were equally capable of bizarre superstitions, logic-defying customs, and often hilariously derisive views of their fellow Romans and non-Romans.   (Read more)

Cabinet of Roman Curiosities

The Rule of Empires

Timothy Parsons

In The Rule of Empires, Timothy Parsons gives a sweeping account of the evolution of empire from its origins in ancient Rome to its most recent twentieth-century embodiment. He explains what constitutes an empire and offers suggestions about what empires of the past can tell us about our own historical moment.   (Read more)

The Rule of Empires

Vanished Ocean

Dorrik Stow

This is a book about an ocean that vanished six million years ago - the ocean of Tethys. Named after a Greek sea nymph, there is a sense of mystery about such a vast, ancient ocean, of which all that remains now are a few little pools, like the Caspian Sea. There were other great oceans in the history of the Earth - Iapetus, Panthalassa - but Tethys was the last of them, vanishing a mere moment (in geological terms) before Man came on the scene. Once Tethys stretched across the world. How do we know? And how could such a vast ocean vanish? The clues of its existence are scattered from Morocco to China. This book tells the story of the ocean, from its origins some 250 million years ago, to its disappearance. It also tells of its impact on life on Earth. The dinosaurs were just beginning to get going when Tethys formed, and they were long dead by the time it disappeared. Dorrik Stow describes the powerful forces that shaped the ocean; the marine life it once held and the rich deposits of oil that life left behind; the impact of its currents on environment and climate.    (Read more)

Vanished Ocean

AIA Guide to New York City

Fifth edition

Norval White, The late Elliot Willensky and Fran Leadon
Hailed as "extraordinarily learned" (New York Times), "blithe in spirit and unerring in vision," (New York Magazine), and the "definitive record of New York's architectural heritage" (Municipal Art Society), Norval White and Elliot Willensky's book is an essential reference for everyone with an interest in architecture and those who simply want to know more about New York City.
First published in 1968, the AIA Guide to New York City has long been the definitive guide to the city's architecture. Moving through all five boroughs, neighborhood by neighborhood, it offers the most complete overview of New York's significant places, past and present. The Fifth Edition continues to include places of historical importance - including extensive coverage of the World Trade Center site - while also taking full account of the construction boom of the past 10 years, a boom that has given rise to an unprecedented number of new buildings by such architects as Frank Gehry, Norman Foster, and Renzo Piano. All of the buildings included in the Fourth Edition have been revisited and re-photographed and much of the commentary has been re-written, and coverage of the outer boroughs - particularly Brooklyn -- has been expanded.    (Read more)

AIA Guide to New York City

Bridges
The science and art of the world's most inspiring structures

David Blockley

Bridges touch all our lives - every day we are likely to cross a bridge, or go under one. How many of us stop to consider how the bridge stands up and what sort of people designed and built something so strong?
Bridge building is a magnificent example of the practical and every day use of science. However, the story of bridges goes beyond science and technology, and involves issues relating to artistic and cultural development. After all, bridges are built by people, for people. Bridges can be icons for whole cities; just consider New York's Brooklyn Bridge, London's Tower Bridge, and Sydney's Harbour Bridge. Such bridges can be considered functional public art, as they have the power to delight or be an eyesore.
FDavid Blockley explains how to read a bridge, in all its different forms, design, and construction, and the way the forces flow through arches and beams. He combines the engineering of how bridges stand up with the cultural, aesthetic, and historical importance they hold. Drawing on examples of particular bridges from around the world, he also looks in detail at the risk engineers take when building bridges, and examines why things sometimes go wrong.    (Read more)

Bridges

Sense of Sociability
How People Overcome the Forces Pulling Them Apart

Lorne Tepperman

Are human beings a species in constant need of firm, aggressive government to save us from ourselves? Or are we fundamentally sociable beings, woven together in a complex array of networks, interdependent and willing to work together? The Sense of Sociability is a modern, highly readable, and often idiosyncratic look at human sociability by one of Canada's top sociologists. Lorne Tepperman explores why we have difficulty getting along, and why in spite of these difficulties we still manage for the most part to live together. Without interference from poor government and other malign influences, he argues, people can work out a great deal of their lives themselves. Tepperman, one of Canada's foremost sociologists, sees it as his job to look at our "unwashed" history to reveal how ordinary people doing ordinary things is the process that makes human history.   (Read more)

Sense of Sociability

The Plundered Planet
Why We Must - and How We Can - Manage Natural Resources for Global Prosperity

Paul Collier

Paul Collier's The Bottom Billion was greeted as groundbreaking when it appeared in 2007, winning the Estoril Distinguished Book Prize, the Arthur Ross Book Award, and the Lionel Gelber Prize. The Economist wrote that it was "set to become a classic," the Financial Times praised it as "rich in both analysis and recommendations," while Nicholas Kristof of the New Yo

Two Billion Cars
Driving Toward Sustainability

Daniel Sperling and Deborah Gordon

Today there are over a billion vehicles in the world, and within twenty years, the number will double, largely a consequence of China's and India's explosive growth. Given that greenhouse gases are already creating havoc with our climate and that violent conflict in unstable oil-rich nations is on the rise, will matters only get worse? Or are there hopeful signs that effective, realistic solutions can be found?   (Read more)

Two Billion Cars

Six-Legged Soldiers
Using Insects as Weapons of War

Jeffrey A. Lockwood

In Six-Legged Soldiers, Jeffrey A. Lockwood paints a brilliant portrait of the many weirdly creative, truly frightening, and ultimately powerful ways in which insects have been used as weapons of war, terror, and torture. He concludes with a critical analysis of today's defenses--and homeland security's dangerous shortcomings--with respect to entomological attacks.  (Read more)

Six-Legged Soldiers

Wasting Away
The Undermining of Canadian Health Care, Second Edition

Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong

Wasting Away is a provocative text that examines and assesses the Canadian health care system. This seven-chapter book explores the development of the Canadian health care system and breaks the analysis down into accessible units: who provides (the institutions and the people); who pays (funding sources); and who decides (public, private, and patients). The concluding chapter sums up the winners and losers in this system. A new Introduction by the authors thoroughly updates the subject.  (Read more)

Wasting Away

The Double Ghetto
Canadian Women and Their Segregated Work, Updated Third Edition

Pat Armstrong and Hugh Armstrong

One of the classic studies of Canadian sociology - now reissued with a new introduction by the authors - The Double Ghetto is a thought-provoking examination of women in the workforce and how their roles have both changed and yet stayed the same over the past four decades.  (Read more)

The Double Ghetto

Ethnicity and Human Rights in Canada
Third Edition

Evelyn Kallen

This book examines key issues surrounding ethnicity and human rights in our country. It asks: How do we account for the persistence of racism in the face of increasing legal protection for human rights?

Kallen's classic study reveals the ways in which human rights violations, by way of discrimination on the bases of race and ethnicity, create and sustain the marginalized status of diverse racial and ethnic groups in Canada. Minority rights issues central to the concerns of Canada's three major ethnic constituencies are examined: Aboriginal peoples, Franco-Quebecois, and racial and ethnic immigrant groups. Other central issues - gender, religious symbolism, and the mosaic versus the melting pot - are also considered.   (Read more)

Ethnicity and Human Rights in Canada

Corporate Power in a Globalizing World

William Carroll

Winner of the Porter Prize, this classic study thoroughly profiles the corporate elite of late twentieth-century Canada, within a global context. It traces the fundamental changes in the structure of corporate power in Canada since the mid-1970s and highlights such key issues as the place of Canadian corporate power in global context, the westward shift of Canadian corporate power, and the emergence of a North American corporate elite.  (Read more)

Corporate Power in a Globalizing World

The Jews in Canada

Edited by Robert J. Brym, William Shaffir and Morton Weinfeld

Ethnic groups in Canada may be successful, persecuted, cohesive, or endangered; only Canada's Jews appear to embody all of these characteristics simultaneously. Canadian Jewry is enduringly fascinating, worth knowing about because the community is an archetype of multiculturalism as it confronts the difficulties and advantages of ethnicity in the modern world. By examining the achievements of the community, and the challenge of its attempt to survive the exigencies of modern life, The Jews in Canada clarifies not only the evolution of Canada's Jewish community but also the evolution of ethnicity in Canadian society. The Wynford edition includes a comprehensive new introduction by the editors updating key findings for the twenty-first century.  (Read more)

The Jews in Canada

Regions Apart
The Four Societies of Canada and The United States

Edward Grabb and The late James Curtis

Regions Apart: The Four Societies of Canada and the United States provides an invaluable social, cultural, and political comparison of the two countries that share the world's longest undefended border. General readers and students alike will find Regions Apart an insightful analysis of how and why Americans and Canadians differ, not only from each other but from region to region within each country. Recognizing the inevitability of the comparison - at least for Canadians! - the authors explore the myths about the historical development of the two nations and provide their own thought-provoking interpretation. They argue that the original American colonies and English Canada were very similar societies and that the differences that emerged as the countries developed resulted not simply because of the rupture caused by the American Revolution, but because of internal divisions in each country - between English and French Canada and between the American North and South - that set the two nations on different paths. The Wynford edition includes a new introduction by Edward Grabb bringing this groundbreaking study fully up to date.  (Read more)

Regions Apart

The Visual Arts in Canada
The Twentieth Century

Edited by Anne Whitelaw, Brian Foss and Sandra Paikowsky

The Visual Arts in Canada: The Twentieth Century charts the developments in Canadian art from the late-nineteenth century to the present with new essays by the country's leading art historians. A comprehensive overview, this volume embraces painting, sculpture, photography, design, video, and conceptual and cross-disciplinary art, as well as studies of art institutions and historiography. With such a remarkable scope, it is truly the first of its kind ever published. Each chapter explores the richness and diversity of Canadian art; topics range from impressionist painting to the multimedia work of First Nations artists, and from the Group of Seven to contemporary video production.   (Read more)

The Visual Arts in Canada

Cleopatra
A Biography

Duane W. Roller

Few personalities from classical antiquity are more famous--yet more poorly understood--than Cleopatra VII, queen of Egypt. In the centuries since her death in 30 BC, she has been endlessly portrayed in the arts and popular culture, from Shakespearean tragedy to paintings, opera, and movies. Despite the queen's enduring celebrity, however, many have dismissed her as a mere seductress. In this major new biography, Duane Roller reveals that Cleopatra was in fact a learned and visionary leader whose overarching goal was always the preservation of her dynasty and kingdom.   (Read more)

Cleopatra

Faith and Power
Religion and Politics in the Middle East

Bernard Lewis is recognized around the globe as one of the leading authorities on Islam. Hailed as "the world's foremost Islamic scholar" (Wall Street Journal ), as "a towering figure among experts on the culture and religion of the Muslim world" (Baltimore Sun ), and as "the doyen of Middle Eastern studies" (New York Times ), Lewis is nothing less than a national treasure, a trusted voice that politicians, journalists, historians, and the general public have all turned to for insight into the Middle East.

Now, Lewis has brought together writings on religion and government in the Middle East, so different than in the Western world. The collection includes previously unpublished writings, English originals of articles published before only in foreign languages, and an introduction to the book by Lewis.   (Read more)

Faith and Power

Food Politics
What Everyone Needs to Know

Robert Paarlberg

The politics of food is changing fast. In rich countries, obesity is now a more serious problem than hunger. Consumers once satisfied with cheap and convenient food now want food that is also safe, nutritious, fresh, and grown by local farmers using fewer chemicals. Heavily subsidized and under-regulated commercial farmers are facing stronger push-back from environmentalists and consumer activists, and food companies are under the microscope. Meanwhile in developing countries, agricultural success in Asia has spurred income growth and dietary enrichment, but agricultural failure in Africa has left one third of all citizens undernourished. The international markets that link these diverse regions together are subject to sudden disruption, as noted when an unexpected spike in international food prices in 2008 caused street riots in a dozen or more countries.    (Read more)

Food Politics

The Oxford Companion to the Book
First Edition

Edited by Michael F. Suarez and H. R. Woudhuysen

The Oxford Companion to the Book is a unique work of reference, covering the book (broadly conceived) throughout the world from ancient to modern times. It includes traditional subjects such as bibliography, palaeography, the history or printing, editorial theory and practice, textual criticism, book collecting, and libraries, but it also engages with newer disciplines such as the history of the book and the electronic book. It pays particular attention to how different societies shape books and how books shape societies.   (Read more)

The Oxford Companion to the Book

The Globalization of Addiction
A Study in Poverty of the Spirit

Bruce Alexander

The Globalization of Addiction presents a radical rethink about the nature of addiction.

Scientific medicine has failed when it comes to addiction. There are no reliable methods to cure it, prevent it, or take the pain out of it. There is no durable consensus on what addiction is, what causes it, or what should be done about it. Meanwhile, it continues to increase around the world. This book argues that the cause of this failure to control addiction is that the conventional wisdom of the 19th and 20th centuries focused too single-mindedly on the afflicted individual addict. Although addiction obviously manifests itself in individual cases, its prevalence differs dramatically between societies. For example, it can be quite rare in a society for centuries, and then become common when a tribal culture is destroyed or a highly developed civilization collapses. When addiction becomes commonplace in a society, people become addicted not only to alcohol and drugs, but to a thousand other destructive pursuits: money, power, dysfunctional relationships, or video games. A social perspective on addiction does not deny individual differences in vulnerability to addiction, but it removes them from the foreground of attention, because social determinants are more powerful.   (Read more)

The Globalization of Addiction

The Oxford Handbook of Canadian Politics

Edited by John Courtney and David Smith

Canada officially achieved legislative autonomy in 1931 and has since developed into one of the world's most prosperous democracies. Though its political system is widely commended for its stability and fairness, it is nonetheless extremely complex. Particularly within the past five decades, Canada has undergone a vast social and political revolution, as exhibited by events such as the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, the ratification of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Medical Care Act of 1966 and the official adoption of bilingualism and multiculturalism. As the world moves towards globalization, technology has likewise facilitated communication between previously isolated provinces and territories within Canada. Such developments hold significant implications for the role of Canadian politics, both domestically and internationally.    (Read more)

The Oxford Handbook of Canadian Politics&